(A) Spencer Altemont Mosely (1925-98) was a pivotal figure in the Washington art scene. He taught for 26 years at the University of Washington, also serving as director of the School of Art and acting director of the Henry Art Gallery. In addition, as a dedicated advocate for Northwest art he wrote a number of publications on Northwest artists. Moseley trained at the University of Washington and then with the legendary modernist Fernand Léger (1881–1955) in Paris. Though he created a large body of paintings and prints he rarely exhibited or sold his work. As a teacher, working artist, and arts advocate, Moseley was intimately aware of the rapidly changing art world of the 20th century. He treated the numerous shifting styles at mid-century as a vocabulary he could use interchangeably as the mood took him. His works embraced modernism, abstraction, cubism, pop and op art, and a variety of variations throughout his career. Common to all his works was bold color and strong outlines: objects and shapes in his paintings often have an almost three-dimensional impact. Measurements: Including the 2-inch frame, 21 1/2 wide by 27 tall. (e-mail Jack for a price)

 

(B) William Ashby McCloy (1913-2000), painter in oil. Raised in China until the age of 13, William McCloy returned to the States in 1926 and began his formal art education at the University of Iowa in 1930. After a varied career of teaching and working as a clinical psychologist in the U.S. Army, McCloy again returned to the University of Iowa to receive a Ph. D. in Painting and later in Art History. He later served as Director of the School of Art at the University of Manitoba, and later as Chairman of the Art Department at Connecticut College. Measurements: Including the 2 3/4 inch frame, 23 wide by 29 tall. (e-mail Jack for a price)

 

(C) Cora Adelaide Reid (1866-1943), painter. Born in Lousiana, Reid taught are in Missouri in 1900-1910 and New Mexico in 1920. Shortly thereafter, she established an art studio in Riverside, CA. A spinster, she died in Riverside. Her rare paintings include landscapes of the desert near San Diego. (listed in E. M. Hughes, Artists in California, 3rd edition). Measurements: Including the 2 5/8 inch frame, 18 1/2 wide by 15 1/8 tall. (e-mail Jack for a price)

 

(D) Hal O. Johnson (1908-1989), painter in oil, watercolor and monotype. Born in North Dakota. Moved to Portland, OR in 1936. Worked for Disney Studios in the 1930's. Exhibited Portland Art Museum 1955; Seattle Art Museum 1964. Had a studio at Cannon Beach, OR. (...taken from M. Sharylen, "Artists of the Pacific Northwest", 1993.) Measurements: Including the 3-inch frame, 19 1/2 wide by 16 1/2 tall. (e-mail Jack for a price)

 

(E) William Fletcher Jones (1930-1996), painter in oil. Lived and worked in Richmond, VA. Measurements: 9 1/4 wide by 16 1/4 tall. (e-mail Jack for a price)

 

   

(F) Besides apple pie, what's more American than the art of Thomas Hart Benton? No, Dear Reader, this isn't the original, it's a mere (but "period") print of... Louisiana Rice Fields -- and in its original frame, too! Overall measurements: 28 by 21 1/2; the art itself, 18 1/2 by 11. (e-mail Jack for a price)

 

 

(G) A vibrant, colorful cubist-inspired oil painting on canvas entitled "Workman's Shack" (written in pencil on verso) by Opal Danz (signed lower left), measuring about 26 1/2 high, 20 wide (original limed oak frame included in the measurement, which is about 2 1/4 wide). (e-mail Jack for a price)

 

 

 

(H) Arguably Lyman Byxbe's best known and most coveted etching (and how easily that claim is made) -- Hallettes Peak. Measurements: 14 3/4 by 13 3/4; the art itself, 6 3/4 by 5 1/4. (e-mail Jack for a price)

 

 

 

(I) Here's another zinger by one of my favorite American artists, Thomas Hart Benton. This period print is entitled "Spring Training." Ha-ha, how clever... Measurements: 30 1/2 by 27 1/2 including the frame; image, 21 by 17. (e-mail Jack for a price)

 


 

(J) For our desert fans! Really, how much better does it get? Stephen Willard's (signed and dated 1922) photographic, hand-colored print, "The White Noon," measures 22 by 18 inches, including its original frame. (e-mail Jack for a price)

 

 

(K) R. H. Palenske's etching "Gulls at Monterey," a classic piece of period California art, measures 12 1/2 by 16 1/4; the artwork measures 7 by 8 1/2. (e-mail Jack for a price)

 

 

(L) This exquisitely rendered representation of the natural beauty that so many love about California is by Marion Kavanagh Wachtel, from 1917 no less. Hmmm... that would make it just over 100 years old -- yippee, a real antique! It's entitled "The Oaks 'The Santa Paula valley with the last touch of sun in the mountains.'" Is that old-timey enough for you? And cute?!! It measures 16 1/2 by 11 1/2 and, as you can see, is in its original frame. (e-mail Jack for a price)

 

 

(M) This particular photograveur of that famous moment when Moses was extracted from the bullrushes is copyrighted 1905, reproduced with the permission of the then-owner Sir John Aird. It's the work of the world-famous painter Alma Tadema. In its original dark wood (walnut?) frame, the art itself measures about 20 by 30 inches. (e-mail Jack for a price)

 

 

(N) Two of Bafuku Ohno's (1888-1976) compelling, decorative mid-century landscape prints (1951), these entitled "Spring" and "Autumn," printed by Shinagawa and in their original frames, with their original mats. Measurements: about 20 1/2 wide by 15 3/4 high. Image size: about 15 by 10 1/2. (e-mail Jack for a price)

 

(O) Roubille's transitional drum-wielding clown lends a mischievous air in this small but powerfully decorative lithograph. It measures 11 3/8 by 15 3/4, including the frame; the art measures 4 1/2 by 9 3/4. (e-mail Jack for a price)

 

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