(A) Fine American Art Nouveau isn't exactly around every corner, but here's one fine example! Signed B&H on the back (Bradley & Hubbard, one of America's more artistically-inclined companies from the earlier 20th century), this ring tray brings grace and beauty to bear. It's about 7 inches long, and is cast iron, silver-plated and patinated. (e-mail Jack for a price)

 

(B) Ah, the long tresses and silken wraps of the Art Nouveau period (of sexual repression). Little wonder that men put their energies into likenesses of what was forbidden (many, as you know, found ways around these strictures). Would you believe this tiny jewel (a mere 3 3/4 inches high, 5 1/2 wide) functions as a planter?! Good for a couple of small succulents, no? Put it on your desk, Mister, and you'll have the ladies wowed, "He's so in touch with the natural world..." (e-mail Jack to start the conversation)

 

(C) Speaking of "jewels" takes us to this blaze of glory, a gold-finished bronze casting by none other than the famed Barbedienne foundry of Paris. I'd date it somewhere around the 1880s, but you have to remember I'm just a shoemaker. It's cabinet-worthy, being only 2 1/2 inches high (including the handles). The superior artistry and craftsmanship take the breath away (other pix by request). Some bozo dropped it and as you can see, it's on a bit of a tilt. The pedestal screws off with a few twists; the right metal expert can probably work his magic and rid it of this unfortunate history (and the tilt!). Truly amazing to behold! (e-mail Jack for a price)

 

(D) Art Nouveau of this quality in...America?!! Yes, there were exceptions to the clichés aimed at emptying out the gum-chewing public's pockets. This silver-plated basket is the work of Pairpoint, one of the more prominent companies of the time, with a long history and extensive product offerings (lamps particularly). Perfect for rolls on the dinner table or...? Signed and in excellent condition, 9 1/2 high and 12 3/4 long. (e-mail Jack for a price)

 

 

 

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